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Here we are at the end of the road. This is, most probably, the last interview in a series of interviews featuring the artists of “New Blood. Old Money.”

Fifteen Artists were represented in the show. This is the twelfth interview.

Not all of the artists made it in on time, but as we all know, time marches on.

You see, this show closes this Saturday, September 17th. That means you literally have only three more opportunities to see this show in its entirety. We, at Kettle Art, suggest you get down to Deep Ellum pronto to check out some great art.

So, without further delay, we bring you the last virtual sit-down for “New Blood. Old Money.” where we have a quick chat with Brian A Crawford.

 Brian A Crawford

Brian A Crawford

www.crawfordartworks.com

 

Kettle – Tell us a bit about yourself (give a brief bio).

Brian – Well, I grew up in Oklahoma around the Tulsa area. I was fascinated by comic books as a kid, and always envisioned becoming a comic book artist. You could always find me drawing. My sketchpad was always nearby. As you might expect, art was my favorite subject in school & my dream was to attend Kansas City Art Institute after high school.

However, I was plagued with two nagging thoughts. How would I (really, my parents!) afford the Art Institute? How would I make a living creating art after attending college? Since I couldn’t resolve those two questions as a seventeen year-old kid, I settled on a state school & a major that would provide me with a decent living after college.

During this time I pretty much abandoned art. About the only artwork I produced was a design for a fraternity sweatshirt. The same could be said for the years following my graduation from college.

It wasn’t until after getting married in 2000, at the urging of my wife, that I started to dabble in creating art again. One class led to another until I was hooked. I even had the rare opportunity to return to school at CCCCD & UNT to work on a BFA in 2004 & 2005. Although I still find myself about 20 some-odd hours short of my degree, it was an experience that I will never forget. It was such a great time to be connected with other artists & to receive training & instruction from some great, seasoned artists. It was that re-introduction to the arts that has essentially put me where I am today.

I feel really blessed to be where I am. I currently have the best of both worlds. I have a great “day job” with a group of people with whom I really enjoy working that is a direct result of receiving my first degree outside of the art realm. It’s also that “day job” that allows me to raise a family & pursue this newfound passion for creating art. It’s my hope to continue this path indefinitely into the future as my work continues to grow & evolve.   

And These Three Remain ... Faith, Hope & Love

And These Three Remain ... Faith, Hope & Love

Kettle – The name of this show is titled, “New Blood, Old Money”. Which are you, “New Blood” or “Old Money”? 

Brian – I really struggle answering this question. You see, I totally feel like “New Blood.” Although I’ve been associated with Kettle for a while now, I still feel new to the scene. This might be because I don’t live anywhere near Deep Ellum. I’m totally out in the suburbs (McKinney). This makes it hard to stay connected with all the regular “Kettle Crew” that have been associated with the gallery for years.

I also feel like “Old Blood,” because I HAVE been associated with Kettle for a few years now. I first came in contact with Frank & the gallery in 2007 when there was a call for artists for a mural competition in Deep Ellum. I worked for a week on a study of Leadbelly to enter in the competition & ended up being selected to participate. That was such a cool experience. I had never painted a mural before & was totally intimidated by the process. Frank gave me a few pointers during the week & a lot of encouragement as I battled the heat while painting my mural. I guess it paid off because I ended up receiving third place in that competition. That mural is still up on the side of the old Elm Street Bar at Elm & Crowdus.

I returned to Deep Ellum the next year for another mural competition. This time I painted a much larger mural on the backside of the Door on Main Street. Entitled “Deep Ellum Koi,’ it depicts two koi fish encircling a yin-yang symbol with kanji-script of the word “deep” in the center. I received third place in that competition as well.

In 2009, I returned to Deep Ellum once again to participate in the Deep Ellum Mural Project where murals were painted along Good-Latimer to commemorate the opening of the Green Line Dart Rail Line. The mural I completed for this project is entitled “Gateway Koi.” It depicts two large koi leaping out of water over lily pads and flowers. It is located at Swiss & Good-Latimer. I had a blast painting that mural even though it was painted mostly in 100+ heat during the month of July. You can watch a documentary of that project here. (The documentary is courtesy of Hard Sun Productions)

It was through these early introductions to Kettle through the mural competitions that I began to display some of my work at the gallery. 

And These Three Remain ... Faith

And These Three Remain ... Faith

Kettle – So, what intrigues or excites you about exhibiting at Kettle Art?

Brian – I love the venue & I love the people. Frank really has put together a great place that allows local artists to “cut their teeth,” so to speak. It also allows artists the chance to experiment and really find the direction they want their work to go.

It has been great getting my pieces ready for this show & to be able to put them up next to other artists I respect & admire.    

And These Three Remain ... Hope

And These Three Remain ... Hope

Kettle – How long have you been associated with Kettle Art? What past shows have you shown your work? Which one was the most memorable so far?

Brian – I’ve been associated with Kettle since 2007. At first, it was mainly through the mural competitions & projects, but I have slowly begun showing other work as well. In 2009, I had paintings in three shows; “Birds Vs. Skulls,” “To Be Scene” & “The Whole Show.” In 2010, I participated in “For the Love of Kettle” & “Holiday Presence.” This year, I showed in “For the Love of Kettle” again & this show, “New Blood. Old Money.”

I would have to say that the most memorable so far would be this show, because this is the first show at Kettle where I have painted several large paintings specifically for one show. It also marks a time in my life as an artist where I have seen tremendous growth. It’s also really nice (and humbling) to have my work displayed along side some of the artists that I have admired for quite a while now.

“For the Love of Kettle” shows are also memorable because of the atmosphere. The scene of hundreds of people crowding into the gallery to snag their favorite piece art for dirt cheap is something to behold. There are always over a hundred works of art that are usually sold within the first hour or so of the doors being opened on opening night. It’s a really fun time. 

And These Three Remain ... Love

And These Three Remain ... Love

Kettle – How many pieces do you have on exhibit for “New Blood. Old Money.”? Can you tell us a little about each one?

Brian – I have six pieces on display; two triptychs.

The first triptych is the one I referred to earlier. Its a large piece consisting of three 18″ x 36″ x 2″ paintings that depict koi fish swimming over a large area of geometric patterns that exhibit signs of wear and a distinct patina in areas. It is entitled, “And These Three Remain … Faith, Hope & Love.” The title is taken from the references to scripture from 1 Corinthians 13 that are included within the painting, as well as, references to the words faith, hope & love depicted within the painting using kanji-script.

The second triptych is much smaller. It consists of three 9″ x 9″ x 2″ paintings that depict koi fish leaping out of water over the words faith, hope & love written either in English or kanji-script.

Faith, Hope, Love (FHL Triptych)

Faith, Hope, Love (FHL Triptych)

Kettle – Where did you find the inspiration for these pieces?

Brian – As you might infer from the previous question, a lot of my work draws inspiration from scripture. I find words to be extremely powerful. They can build up or tear down. They leave permanent marks once they leave the mouth or are typed on the keyboard; either for good or bad. Words have consequences. When it comes to words, scripture is foundational.

I have always been drawn to the use of words within art. Jenny Holzer’s work always comes to mind & it has definitely influenced me. I also like Sergio Garcia’s recent works where he employs the use of words that create phrases that are just a bit off. Good stuff, indeed.

I also have found inspiration from Asian culture. I started painting koi fish back in 2007 when a good friend asked me to create three paintings for a restaurant he was opening up in Seattle. After that experience, I became intrigued with the use of kanji script & with koi fish in general. I have continued painting koi fish because of their beautiful form, and because of the symbolism that can be associated with them. Because koi fish symbolize good fortune, love, courage, and are also associated with perseverance in adversity and strength of purpose, I continue to paint them while working relevant scripture into each painting.

I also find inspiration in aged things; The patina found on aged metal & the multiple layers of paint you might find peeling off of an old door. 

Faith (FHL Triptych)

Faith (FHL Triptych)

Kettle – Were you able to attend opening night for “New Blood. Old Money.”? What was your favorite part of the night? What pieces really stood out to you?

Brian – Yes, I was. My favorite part of the night was just being able to hang out with so many people & get to talk about art. I really enjoyed talking with the other artists in the show & having the opportunity to talk with one of my old instructors, Merry Fuhrer, who continues to offer guidance & encouragement to me.

All the pieces in the show were outstanding in their own right, but I did gravitate to a few choice works throughout the night.

I found the work of Kettle newcomer, Tony Reans, to be outstanding. His “Flash Gordon” pop art pieces that incorporated old Flash Gordon comic strips were so very well done.

I also enjoyed the work of curator, Clint Scism. I am totally amazed at his ability to suspend his graphic illustrations between layers of glass to produce such beautiful works.

Of course, I should also mention the work of Richard Ross. His work seems so simplistic, but I could never produce anything like it. He makes it look like the neighbor kid could have done it, but upon closer inspection you see many layers of color & a complexity all of it’s own.

Kelsey Kincannon’s work was also a highlight for me. There is just something about animals wearing suits that makes for good art! (seriously, they are wicked good) 

Love (FHL Triptych)

Love (FHL Triptych)

Kettle – Will you be showing with Kettle again?

Brian – Most definitely!

Kettle – Do you have any other shows coming up where one could see your work?

Brian – I don’t have any shows planned as of yet, but I do expect that I will have a couple pieces at “Holiday Presence” again this year.

I also have a couple other projects in the works. These projects will be a bit of a departure from the koi pieces I have been doing for the last couple of years, but the will still incorporate bold earthy colors, geometric shapes & scripture. You will just have to wait until the projects are underway to see how they unfold. :-)

Hopefully, you can watch these projects unfold on my blog.

Hope (FHL Triptych)

Hope (FHL Triptych)

Kettle – What is in the future for you and your art? Do you see yourself or your art developing in any particular way in the near future?

Brian – I hope over the next year to start working in a much larger format. I want to really loosen up my paintings, add texture, and move more toward abstraction. I’m not exactly sure how that is going to unfold, but I do have a few things planned out in my mind already.

Kettle - Where else can one find your work? (online or otherwise)

Brian – you can find me & my work online at the following places:

Website: http://www.crawfordartworks.com

Blog: http://www.crawfordartworks.com/blog/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/#!/brian.a.crawford

Facebook Fan Page: https://www.facebook.com/#!/CrawfordArtworks

Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/bacrawford

“New Blood. Old Money.” is still up, but the show closes this Saturday, September 17th. So, get down to Deep Ellum and see it while you still can. 
 
Next up at Kettle is a show that has everyone buzzing. Campagna 2 opens September 22nd featuring the art of father-daughter duo, Frank & Amber Campagna. It is most definitely a show that should not be missed!

It’s been a whirwind of an interviewfest & it’s hard to believe we have come so far. Over the past couple of weeks we have brought you virtual sit-downs featuring the artists that currently have their work on display in “New Blood. Old Money.” here at Kettle Art.

Well, this is number 11.

Eleven down. Four to go.

Not sure we’ll get all fifteen in before closing time, but we’ll just have to wait and see how that plays out.

Number 11 simply brings us a shining example of “New Blood.”

Number 11 is none other than Tony Reans.

“Who is Tony Reans?”, you might ask.

Well read on, my friend. Read on …

Tony Reans

Tony Reans

Kettle – Tell us a bit about yourself (give a brief bio).

Tony – I was a mediocre artist as a child, with modest potential, and as an adult, I didn’t create any art until my late twenties. After two stints in the Air Force (where I was an electrician), I went back to college in my thirties, to study fine art, concentrating on graphic design.

Which was great. Really. And even though design could land me a day job, it was fine art that really called to me. Once I discovered painting, man, I really caught the fever, and my life ever since has been all dripping acrylics and oils, gessoes and varnishes. Now I paint, teach art, and do freelance photography.

Kettle – The name of this show is titled, “New Blood, Old Money”. Which are you, “New Blood” or “Old Money”?

Tony – New Blood when it comes to exhibiting at Kettle, thank you very much. I meant it. Thank you very much.

Kettle – So, what intrigues or excites you about exhibiting at Kettle Art?

Tony – This is my first exhibit in Dallas, which is very exciting – Kettle has a great reputation. My wife and I have lived in Shreveport, Louisiana, for about 20 years (that’s where I was stationed in the Air Force), and I’ve been keenly interested in getting my work seen in Texas for a while. I’m originally from the Houston area, so I want to get back into my home state!

I was invited to show at Kettle by Robb Conover, who was introduced to me by a mutual friend, so that’s also a wonderful blessing. Networking in this fashion is how an art career is made, and meeting new friends makes it worth the making.

Tony Reans - "Flash, I Love You"

"Flash, I Love You"

Kettle – How many pieces do you have on exhibit for “New Blood. Old Money.”? Can you tell us a little about each one?

Tony – I have two paintings at Kettle right now. They’re the first two in an ongoing hero-worship-themed series I’m doing.

The first is:

Flash, I Love You!

36″ x 36″ x 2.5″
Acrylic and collage on canvas
March 2011

This one’s not based on an actual Gordon comic, but is instead a vision from my own fevered imagination. I painted elements from various Sunday comics from 1934 to 1940 or so, building up the composition to create a scene from Flash’s point of view (something the real series apparently never did). So we’re seeing through his eyes, through a sort-of “telepathic window.”

As often occurred in the series, Flash and his girlfriend, Dale Arden, are on the run from Ming the Merciless’ army. In a brief quiet moment, Dale expresses her love for Flash, and just as he’s responding, the army opens fire, interrupting them. The collaged comics depict war scenes and romantic moments from the years I used for the painting.

The second is:

A Love Like Ours

36″ x 36″ x 2.5″
Acrylic and collage on canvas
August 2011

Here, I’ve painted panel number five out of five for one particular Sunday in 1937. Flash and Dale are looking for their friend and fellow earthling, Dr. Hans Zarkov, who is lost in a jungle on the planet Mongo. As a terrible storm approaches, Flash is suddenly attacked by a killer “living vine,” which wants to strangle him to death. Dale tries to help him, of course, and is attacked by the vine as well. As the two are just about done for, a lightning bolt strikes the vine and kills it, saving our heroic lovers. They’re just happy to be alive, together and in love, and we see that scene depicted in my painting.

I’ve included panels one through four in the collage around the outside of this painting, so a viewer can – if he or she so wishes – read the whole story. The beautiful newspaper comics from the 1930s have a deep, rich patina and the colors are still vibrant and warm even after all these years. 

Kettle – Where did you find the inspiration for these pieces?

Tony – I paint in two distinctly separate themes these days: junk food and hero worship, two very irrational human creations. In the food series, which is iconic in nature (which for me means non-narrative), I concentrate on candy, breakfast cereal, and comfort food, and use food packaging as my collage. The hero worship series is narrative, uses actual vintage comics, and involves my favorite sci-fi action hero, Mr. Gordon. I bought about ten years’ worth of this strip from the 1930s-1940s in a collection on ebay, and I’m going to keep painting until I use them all.

By the way, I should explain that I’m actually rescuing these comics from certain decomposition, as the scrapbooks they were glued into are not of archival quality at all, and simply crumble at the slightest touch. Removing the comics, sealing them in acrylic matte medium, and carefully adhering them to the canvas is a painstaking process (so don’t hate me, comics fans)!

Tony Reans - A Love Like Ours

A Love Like Ours

Kettle – Were you able to attend opening night for “New Blood. Old Money.”? What was your favorite part of the night? What pieces really stood out to you?

Tony – I was there. Meeting all the other artists and art lovers was the highlight of the evening, of course. Everyone’s work is impressive, with Kelsey Kincannon’s and Arthur James’s making the strongest impression on me. Wow. Me likey.

Kettle – Will you be showing with Kettle again?

Tony – Yes, in November, thanks to another invitation by Frank and Robb.

Kettle – Do you have any other shows coming up where one could see your work?

Tony – Besides the Kettle in November, no. Thanks for rubbing that in (Just kidding). I’ve exhibited so much in Shreveport and the surrounding areas that it’s become a little tired. My resume reads, “Shreveport, Shreveport, Shreveport.” That’s why I know it’s time to branch out regionally, and hopefully, nationally. Eight of my foodie paintings just came down from a group show at the Longview Museum of Fine Arts where one of my pieces is now a part of their permanent collection. I’m also represented at Rawstyle Gallery, in Santa Monica, CA, but I don’t have any exhibits coming up there anytime soon. So I’m networking, looking for opportunities!

Kettle – What is in the future for you and your art? Do you see yourself or your art developing in any particular way in the near future?

Tony – Larger Gordons, larger foodies. I like to paint six-foot canvases and larger, which I haven’t done much of lately. I’m also introducing more psychedelic trippy backgrounds into my food paintings, which will take on a more Op Art, highly technical aspect, and will concentrate more on the marketing mascots, like Tony the Tiger.

I’m also working on trading up to a van, bus, or RV, to be transformed into a rolling fine art gallery, which will travel between cities in Texas and Louisiana, creating a network amongst galleries, museums, artists and collectors. I’m trading little things for bigger things, and will eventually make it to a vehicle. Apparently, Artman wants to do something along those same lines, so we may have some kind of art collaboration when one of us gets there. Maybe it’s a race! First one with a van hosts the first exhibit, with the other as a guest artist! I have a blog on the trading project: http://www.ArtBusTradeUp.blogspot.com.

Last but not least, I’m working on a comic-styled instructional book on the art of photography for beginners, based on the class I teach at LSU Shreveport Continuing Education.

Kettle – Where else can one find your work? (online or otherwise)

Tony – Sorry, nowhere in the Dallas area (yet). We’ll have to make do with the Interwebs:

www.Rawstyle.com,

www.tonyreans.com,

www.facebook.com/tonyreans.

“New Blood. Old Money.” is still up & we now know it will be up through September 17th. So, get down to Deep Ellum and see it while you still can. 

Well, we are getting closer to the end. This post marks the 10th interview in the series of interviews featuring the artist’s of the current show at Kettle Art, “New Blood. Old Money.”

Cabe is well known throughout the metroplex for his black & white portraits & it’s an honor to have two hanging in the gallery right now.

It’s a real treat to get to do a virtual sit-down with Cabe Booth.

So, let’s get down to business … 

Cabe Booth

Cabe Booth

Kettle – Tell us a bit about yourself (give a brief bio).  

Cabe Booth is a Dallas based artist specializing in oil, acrylic, graphite and water media.  Booth is interested in how to approach and create the constructed and distressed surfaces he uses as a mixed media sculptural canvas for his paintings.  Subject matter includes portraiture, aviation history and concepts of man’s imitation of nature.  Cabe is most well known for his band portraits, which he started in 1998 at legendary Deep Ellum venue, Curtain Club.  In 2001, he began painting for Nokia Theater where more than 500 commissioned portraits of the venue’s entertainers are on display backstage and in public areas of the theater. Famous subjects in these autographed portraits include Bill Clinton, The Pixies, Tom Waits, The White Stripes, DEVO, Al Gore, Ringo Star, Willie Nelson and Bob Dylan.  Booth’s custom portraits have also been commissioned by The Palladium Ballroom in Dallas, SprintCenter inKansas City and Pizza Hut Park in Frisco. Booth’s work is in numerous private collections including Joe McGregor, Erykah Badu, Frank Black, Mike Watt and George Jones.  

Video of work at Palladium Ballroom backstage (100+ oil and/or acrylic portraits and paintings) http://youtu.be/IQ8yjQgrtV4

Video of works at Nokia Theater (Verizon) both backstage and out in public areas (350+) in several parts:

Part 1 http://youtu.be/OiUUE9zUgIc

Part 2 http://youtu.be/65KKg5HAx0A

Part 3 http://youtu.be/WunV54fP_aY

Part 4 http://youtu.be/29rR0Yh2aEU

Part 5 http://youtu.be/8waWveziiDA

Part 6 http://youtu.be/V-wDaKfeU6A

Part 7 http://youtu.be/KfzVoii6Qgk

Cabe is known for his Murals work and broken wood series. Cabe’s first murals were with Tunnelvisions in Deep Ellum organized by Frank Campagna. Later Cabe collaborated with Campagna on the Fat Ted’s Restaurant Mural (now covered with paint) and once again returned to mural works 10 years later with 5 inside the Gables Park 17 building in uptown (impressionistic tango dance poses) and 2 inside Patrizio’s Restaurants in Ft. Worth (Italian artist Titian detail) and Fairview, both are painted where one would usually see the barroom mirror. The broken wood series is an ongoing style that Booth developed in his college years. Subjects include man, machine and nature. Portrayed through diagrams of early and studied flight, WW2 and WW1 aircraft, dragonflies, sparrows, hawks and butterflies. The most recent and largest broken wood piece “Here comes the chaos” is a departure from only flying subjects and introduces a heard of cats chasing Booth’s usual sparrows on a very large painted installation. A video showing the work and detail can be viewed on his website or here http://youtu.be/vErAxbxvBX4

Booth lives in Dallas with fiancée Kelly and daughter Ella.  He holds a BFA in painting & drawing from theUniversity Of North Texas School Of Visual Arts.  In his free time, Booth is a World War II History buff, enjoys Dallas Stars Hockey, spending time with his daughter and fiancée, and enjoys the North Texas live music scene from which he draws much inspiration.

 Link to Cabe’s model and diorama painting “hobby” http://www.flickr.com/photos/cabebooth/collections/72157601634083197/

also was national junior olympic fencer (36th)

Skateboarded at Blue/Clown Ramp in mid-late 80′s

Joined Delta Lodge Denton spring 1991

Head Booking agent Fry Street Fair for 13 years starting in 1992

KNON Head DJ “Audio Abuse” 1985-1987 at age 16-18

Booth is one of the originating artists in the annual Dallas-area philanthropic event, Art Conspiracy, where he consistently draws very high bids for his work with proceeds generously invested back into the local art community.

Currently, Cabe is available for freelance commission work for venues and individuals. 

Cabe Booth - Johnny Cash

Johnny Cash

Kettle – The name of this show is titled, “New Blood, Old Money”. Which are you, “New Blood” or “Old Money”?  

Cabe – A little of both… or a lot of both actually………

Kettle – As “New Blood”, what intrigues or excites you about exhibiting at Kettle Art?   

Cabe – Last year I finally made changes to allow myself to push for more gallery shows and reconnect with Kettle and other galleries in DFW after 9 years of complete time and attention absorbed by obligations to Nokia Theater (Verizon now), Palladium Ballroom, Pizza Hut Park, Curtains Club and Sprint Center Kansas City. I really felt the solitude and burden of doing so much art with no one to share it with or even getting to display it to the public. I always felt my obligations and horrendous schedule/workload kept me from enjoying and struggling along with not only Deep Ellum artists but other artists as a whole. Here one of my first mentors had opened a gallery and I had no time to create or participate in this exciting new development. It was and always will be a time I will never get back. Cutting loose from the comfort of regular pay and banishing the discomfort of an abusive day to day schedule have meant a lot to me.

This New Blood part of me is just excited to be showing again with local artists and the camaraderie that comes with it. Having peers see his work instead of immediately delivering it to a corporate client is a welcome change

Kettle – As “Old Money”, how long have you been associated with Kettle Art? What past shows have you shown your work? Which one was the most memorable so far? What intrigues you about this particular show?  

Cabe – I have shown in a few shows since the Kettle opened and having been a Deep Ellum artist since the early 90′s (began hanging out in ’85 at twilight room and theater gallery). My Deep Ellum roots are heavily entwined with Frank Campagna who I met at age 15 in 1985 on Greenville Avenue during a parade/festival while he manned a KNON radio booth. Later Frank Helped me get my own KNON radio show on Saturdays (Audio Abuse). After leaving to attend college in both Austin and Denton, Booth returned to Deep Ellum only to reconnect with Campagna in the early/mid 90′s. Frank organized & curated many art shows (about 1 a month possibly) at local bars like Dada and July Alley. Later in 1999, I joined Campagna in an attempt to keep the Deep Ellum Center for the Arts (DECA) open along with Amy Vercruysse and Stephen Elsaesser.

Kettle – How many pieces do you have on exhibit for “New Blood. Old Money.”? Can you tell us a little about each one? 

Cabe – Two works. Both Portraits.

I was a very late addition to the show. Thanks to the guys/gals at Kettle for letting me hop in.

The first portrait is Johnny Cash from the Time Magazine Cover right after his passing. I felt to paint it because firstly, I love the guy and his music. There is no American Icon like Johnny Cash. In this photo he appeared so old, weathered and tired. I felt the need to paint it right after I saw it shortly after his death. Not only is it a wonderful photo of Johnny Cash and his condition both physically and mentally at the time, it’s a solid yet fun challenge to render with all the wrinkles and contours of his face.

The second Image is of David Byrne (lead singer of Talking Heads). I ran across this image right before I decided to try and get into the Kettle show. It was odd because as much as I search Google images etc for photos of interesting people to paint, I had never once seen this one. Obviously taken in the Late 70′s or early 80′s it isn’t a new image, but there it was ready for me to give a try. Odd it never showed up before. I could go on about why I jumped at the image to paint it and why David Byrne , but lets just keep it at “great photo, great band, great man.”

Though I wish I could have also included my other styles, I am never adverse to displaying my portraits. I deeply appreciate the photographers out there that capture these images and often feel guilty for using them. A good photograph of anything takes impeccable timing and talent, or in this case connections or clout to get a chance to capture images of such people.  I use their images with much deference, respect and no attempt to profit more than my efforts from the portraits I paint. The prices for Charity auctions are a bit of a different story as my work claimed the record winning bid at ArtCon 2010 (http://youtu.be/6IXPiy-OyEE).

Kettle – Where did you find the inspiration for these pieces?  

Cabe – See above. 

Kettle – Were you able to attend opening night for “New Blood. Old MOney.”? What was your favorite part of the night? What pieces really stood out to you?

Cabe – Yes. I guess my favorite part was when we all sweated. It was one of the strongest groupings of art and artists I have seen at Kettle. To simply pick one would be difficult. I enjoyed all the paintings and photos.

Cabe Booth - David Byrne

David Byrne

Kettle - Will you be showing with Kettle again?

Cabe – Yes.

Kettle - Do you have any other shows coming up where one could see your work?

Cabe – Possibly the new Smoke and Mirrors Gallery grand opening show. 

Maybe finding a place to show the lark work “Here Comes the chaos” for gallery night (see about me section for video and description of that work).

Kettle – What is in the future for you and your art? Do you see yourself or your art developing in any particular way in the near future?

Cabe - Freeing myself up from my all consuming schedule of painting from supplied images on commission has allowed me to create the ideas I have been documenting in my art idea sketch journal for years. Those alone would keep me busy for the next 10 years at least, but actually working on them brings to my attention new ideas and approaches of course. The opportunity to actually work through and test ideas is extremely inspiring and motivational. It makes me ache for more financial freedom to choose my projects, but for now I am glad just to finally be doing more than sketched out works to be done “whenever if at all”. I do hope to expand my other styles and get a market for both the broken wood and portrait works. Financial security allows much time for uninterrupted thought and time to explore art. And I do really enjoy that pursuit more than anything other than my family. As for friends and socializing it goes hand in hand with being active in the arts and I hope to reconnect and get to know more local artists that should be old friends by now if not for my past 10 years locked away in my studio on constant deadlines. I would like to see myself collaborating with another artist(s) on a large work at some point this year.

Kettle – Where else can one find your work? (online or otherwise) 

Cabehttp://www.flickr.com/photos/cabebooth/collections/72157601627237354/ direct link to all the work I have edited and uploaded to the net on flickr.com (100′s of works- people, pets, portraits etc)

http://http://www.cabebooth.com, my artist website

https://www.facebook.com/Cabe.Booth, my Facebook profile

https://www.facebook.com/CabeBoothArt, my Facebook Art Fan page

Curtain Club Deep Ellum – Hundreds of signed portraits of local and touring bands line the walls

Trees Deep Ellum – Recently started painting for this venue. Maybe 20 to be seen currently

Prophet bar Deep Ellum – 4 really detailed portraits here hung in the smaller room

PizzaHutParkFrisco – around 20 backstage

Sprint CenterKansasCity – about 30  24″x26′ portraits 

Palladium Ballroom Dallas (backstage)

Video of work at Palladium Ballroom backstage (100+ oil and/or acrylic portraits and paintings) http://youtu.be/IQ8yjQgrtV4

Verizon Theater Dallas ( over 400 4′x3′ oil and acrylic portraits and paintings backstage, mezzanine, hallways… its everywhere)

video of works at Nokia Theater (now Verizon)  in several parts:

Part 1 http://youtu.be/OiUUE9zUgIc

Part 2 http://youtu.be/65KKg5HAx0A

Part 3 http://youtu.be/WunV54fP_aY

Part 4 http://youtu.be/29rR0Yh2aEU

Part 5 http://youtu.be/8waWveziiDA

Part 6 http://youtu.be/V-wDaKfeU6A

Part 7 http://youtu.be/KfzVoii6Qgk

My side hobby of painting, detailing and weathering ww2 tanks and AFVS (and dioramas) can be seen in this gallery at http://www.flickr.com/photos/cabebooth/collections/72157601634083197/

My you tube channel - http://www.youtube.com/user/CabeBooth

Cabe Booth

Artist

http://www.CabeBooth.com

214-734-6425

“New Blood. Old Money.” is still up & we now know it will be up through September 17th. So, get down to Deep Ellum and see it while you still can. 
With the ninth installment in the series of interviews featuring the artists from the “New Blood. Old Money.” show we welcome the artist, Kelsey Kincannon.
 
Let’s dive right in & get to know him a bit better …
 
 
Kelsey Kincannon
 
Kelsey Kincannon
 
Kettle – Tell us a bit about yourself (give a brief bio).
 
Kelsey – I’ve been painting off and on for about 15 years.  In that time, I’ve come to value creative growth as a catalyst in personal and intellectual development.  I generally don’t have a message or literal narrative in my work.  I mostly just hope it  sparks the creativity and imagination of others.  To continually push each other forward like this may just be what it’s all about.
 
Kettle - The name of this show is titled, “New Blood, Old Money”. Which are you, “New Blood” or “Old Money”?
 
Kelsey – New Blood! 
 
Kettle - So, what intrigues or excites you about exhibiting at Kettle Art?
 
Kelsey – It’s  a true honor to show work in one of the best galleries in Dallas.
 
 
Kelsey Kincannon - Grackle
 
 
Kettle - How many pieces do you have on exhibit for “New Blood. Old Money.”? Can you tell us a little about each one?
 
Kelsey- I have three paintings in the show. One of them is a profile portrait of a grackle looking rather stately.  Another is a hand print with a little something extra.  And the third is a portrait of a mussy jack rabbit, wearing his jacket and tie.
 
Kettle - Where did you find the inspiration for these pieces?
 
Kelsey – I like the idea of bending nature.  One of the common aims of these pieces was to frame some of the more absurd aspects in a way that makes them seem usual.
 
Kettle – Were you able to attend opening night for “New Blood. Old MOney.”? What was your favorite part of the night? What pieces really stood out to you?
 
Kelsey – Yes.  It was great meeting a lot of the artists in the show.  As well as getting to talk to a couple of folks about my work.  My favorite part of the show was seeing new pieces by artists that I’ve long admired, as well as seeing amazing work from some artists whom I’m just now becoming familiar with.
 
 
Kelsey Kincannon -  Hand
 
 
Kettle - Will you be showing with Kettle again?
 
Kelsey – Fingers crossed…
 
Kettle - Do you have any other shows coming up where one could see your work?
 
Kelsey – You can see me create live at Synchronicity: An ArtLoveMagic Experience.  The event is on September 10th, from 8pm to 2am, at 2826 Arnetic (2826 Elm St., Dallas TX).  Additional details at www.artlovemagic.com.I’ll be showing a few brand new paintings at the Rehab Art Party at Zubar (2012 Greenville Ave., Dallas TX),  on September 14 at 7pm.  The show will feature eleven other amazing artists, including  a couple of the other “New Blood, Old Money” artists, and will be up for viewing for approximately four weeks.  (I’ll also be djing!)I’m also donating a painting to PINK – A Breast Cancer Fundraiser.  Along with an evening of musicians, artists and djs, there will be an art auction to raise money for the cause.  September 22 at 9pm.  Zubar, 2012 Greenville Ave., Dallas TX.
Kettle - What is in the future for you and your art? Do you see yourself or your art developing in any particular way in the near future?
 
Kelsey – Upward and outward.
 
 
Kelsey Kincannon - Hare
 
 
Kettle - Where else can one find your work? (online or otherwise)
 
Kelsey - At mediumheavy.com
 
“New Blood. Old Money.” is still up & we still aren’t sure when it’s coming down. It will be up at least another weekend or so, so get down to Deep Ellum and see it while you still can. 

Number 8.

That is where we find ourselves.

On the downward path.

You see, fifteen artists are represented in the Kettle Art show, “New Blood. Old Money.” Tonight we bring you the eightth interview. I don’t know if we will get to do a virtual sit-down with all fifteen, but tonight mark’s a milestone nonetheless.

It’s appropriate that we are interviewing Robb Conover at number eight. (Okay, I’m not sure it’s “appropriate”, but he is a darn good artist that just so happens to have several pieces at Kettle for this show, and just so happened to be the eightth person interviewed in this series!)

As an artist, Robb is amazing. Not just because his work is so good (And it is, trust me.), but because his artistic range is so wide & varied. He can whip out pop pieces & abstract pieces on a whim (okay, maybe not a whim. but pretty darn quick.), or he can sit down for a while and create detailed photo-realistic pieces. It all depends on how he is feeling on a particular day, or where he wants his artwork to develop the most.

Hopefully, this interview will give you insight into who Robb is & why he is such a blessing to the Dallas art scene.

Enjoy … 

 

Kettle – Tell us a bit about yourself (give a brief bio).

Robb – I grew up with a strong art influence. My father, grandfather and my father’s brothers were all artists. I knew at an early age this was a part of me.

I have had the pleasure of working with some strong talent in my life . Keith Harring, Roy Lichtenstein and a few others. I was part of the club Kid Movement in New York, so that influenced my contacts, my life style and my art.

I attended Pratt in NY and worked as a staff artist and DJ at the Mudd Club in NY.

I create my pop art with a whimsical attitude & a retro feel. My medium and style ranges from POP to Photo Realism and Abstract.

Robb Conover

 

Kettle - The name of this show is titled, “New Blood, Old Money”. Which are you, “New Blood” or “Old Money”?

Robb - I Guess since I’ve been around Kettle for while that makes me “Old Blood”, one of the older artists but with money, … LOL, not likely! 

Kettle – How long have you been associated with Kettle Art? What past shows have you shown your work? Which one was the most memorable so far? What intrigues you about this particular show?

Robb – I had a solo show last year at Kettle called “Stilettos and Candy”, which bordered on each of our darkest secrets. It was a journey done in a fun way. I have also really enjoyed the “For The LOVE OF KETTLE ” shows because of all the new artists shown, and because it’s a great chance to buy new art at a great price. The energy level at those shows is amazing.

This time, I couldn’t pass up the chance to do a show with one of my best friends and one of the best artists at Kettle when I was presented with the opportunity of showing at “New Blood. Old Money.”

Robb Conover

 

Kettle – How many pieces do you have on exhibit for “New Blood. Old Money.”? Can you tell us a little about each one? 

Robb – I took a new direction with this show, I wanted to show a style and technique that I have never shown before or at least one that you haven’t seen from me.  

Two of the pieces are an experiment in what happens with chemicals when applied to the surface with paint. I then applied ink to the paint to bring out certain areas. It’s an experiment that I will expand upon in the very near future.  

Another piece is an assemblage pieces using scrap items from the studio; printer cartridges, floppy disc, empty syringes, dried up markers and pull tabs from cans, It ended up being an industrial looking piece.

The last piece was an experimental piece using recycled products and painting detail on the surface. It was sort of a floral piece with dragonflies.

I wanted to show a strong use of lines and color since I’m known for using bright colors of paint in my work.

Kettle – Where did you find the inspiration for these pieces? 

Robb – From all of the people that have influenced me in the past. I had a teacher early in my career that said “Never use paint straight from the Tube.” I saw her later in life and she asked me what I was doing in art. I replied, “I’m using paint straight from the tube!”

 Robb Conover

 

Kettle - Were you able to attend opening night for “New Blood. Old Money.”? What was your favorite part of the night? What pieces really stood out to you?

Robb – I thought the energy level was one of the best I’ve seen at a show at Kettle. Clint Scism did an incredible job mixing the old with the new.

Kettle - Will you be showing with Kettle again?

Robb – I’m just waiting for the invites from other upcoming curators!

I’m also curating a show in November. It will feature Clint Scism, Corey Godfrey, Erica Fellacella, Frank Campagana, Tony Reans and myself. The theme and subject will be announced soon. We intend to create an event at Kettle that has never been done before, not in Dallas nor at Kettle. Secrets and rumors are already flying about the show!

Kettle - Do you have any other shows coming up where one could see your work? 

Robb – I have work at Artisians Collective in Oakcliff ; a very strong body of work there. I also have a possible solo show upcoming at the Belmont and other project with RO2 and other galleries.

Robb Conover

 

Kettle - What is in the future for you and your art? Do you see yourself or your art developing in any particular way in the near future?

Robb – I figure I’m always a work-in-progress no matter what you see me doing. Don’t think where I’m at is as far as I’m going. I’m always looking for new ways to journey through my artwork and where it will lead me.

Kettle - Where else can one find your work? (online or otherwise)

Robbhttp://www.robbconover.zoomshare.com/ (sadly, it’s not updated)

My Works can be physically seen at: 

Artisians Collective in Oakcliff

Kettle Art

The Meridian Room

The Fallout Lounge

Mine and Vine Gallery In Keller Texas 

Buli’s cafe in Oaklawn

The Drama Room in Oaklawn, the largest body of POP ART of mine in Dallas (including a huge mural)

A mural at Publicist at the Shops at Legacy in Plano, TX.

“New Blood. Old Money.” is still up & we still aren’t sure when it’s coming down. It will be up at least another weekend or so, so get down to Deep Ellum and see it while you still can. 

Over the past few days, Kettle Art has brought you interviews with six of the fifteen artists now being shown in the “New Blood. Old Money.” show. Tonight, we bring you number seven.

Lucky number seven belongs to Sonia Semone.

Sonia is responsible for ArtHash, the blog that keeps everyone in Texas abreast of the latest happenings in the local (and not so local) artworld. She also runs an online gallery, Gallery 75-15.

Tonight we focus on her artwork.

Enjoy …

 Sonia Semone

 Sonia Semone

Kettle - Tell us a bit about yourself.

Sonia – Artist, Traveler, Foodie.

Kettle - The name of this show is titled, “New Blood, Old Money”. Which are you, “New Blood” or “Old Money”?

Sonia – “New Blood”

Kettle – What intrigues or excites you about exhibiting at Kettle Art?

Sonia – I love that Kettle promotes Texas artists.

Kettle – Can you tell us abou the work you are exhibiting at Kettle Art? 

Sonia – My latest body of work is very minimalist in nature. I bring it down to the basics, color and composition. My fascination is with monochrome and extending that into a visually interesting color palette.

Sonia Semone
Kettle – Where did you find the inspiration for this piece?

Sonia – Really they are more of a progression of work I have been doing for a while.

Kettle – Will you be showing with Kettle again?

Sonia – Yes, In January for the ArtHash Uncurated Salon Show

Kettle – What is in the future for you and your art? Do you see yourself or your art developing in any particular way in the near future?

Sonia – I see myself continuing to paint and explore things that make me happy

Kettle – Where else can one find your work?

Sonia – In the new Soju in Tyler, Bowout, Currents and online if you are crafty

“New Blood. Old Money.” is still up & we still aren’t sure when it’s coming down. It will be up at least another weekend or so, so get down to Deep Ellum and see it while you still can. 

Our third Labor Day installment brings us an interview with some definite “Old Blood.”

Tyson Summers has been associated with Kettle Art for many years now & he has most definitely made his mark on Deep Ellum.

His paintings are bold, colorful & fun. They are also all over Deep Ellum in the form of murals that he has been painting since 2007.

Enjoy this brief virtual sit-down …

Tyson Summers

Tyson Summers

www.tysonsummers.com

Kettle – Tell us a bit about yourself (give a brief bio).

Tyson – I call myself a maker of things. I like to create and have been doing so since childhood. I was born into making things with my Dad and Grandfather. Both big inspirations and both extremely talented artists and craftsmen. I knew what I wanted to do early on. My style was born out of a dissatisfaction in my graphic design day jobs. Turning doodles into sellable art, toys and murals is what I like doing.

Tyson Summers

Kettle – The name of this show is titled, “New Blood, Old Money”. Which are you, “New Blood” or “Old Money”? 

Tyson – Old in terms of the show.

Kettle – So, how long have you been associated with Kettle Art? What past shows have you shown your work? Which one was the most memorable so far? What intrigues you about this particular show?

Tyson – My first show was in July 2007 called Cartoon Art Exhibition later to turn into Cartoon Apocalypse in 2008. I’ve been a part of every group show, fundraiser, mural project since 07. Impermanence was a great show. Misha Flores, Larry Carey and myself did Mandalas in honor of the Tibetan Art and the simple fact that nothing is forever. October is my month to reboot and that what I did working on the pieces for Impermanence. 

Tyson Summers

Kettle – How many pieces do you have on exhibit for “New Blood. Old Money.”? Can you tell us a little about each one?

Tyson – Four pieces based on things that have touched my life and made me want to make things. From the little guys outside making a living to punk rock icons. It’s what makes me tick.

Kettle – Where did you find the inspiration for these pieces? 

Tyson – Pressure

Tyson Summers

Kettle – Were you able to attend opening night for “New Blood. Old Money.”? What was your favorite part of the night? What pieces really stood out to you?

Tyson – I was there, Hanging with Frank and taking the night in is always my favorite part. Where there other pieces in the show? kidding I dig checking out the stuff from the new faces.

Kettle – Will you be showing with Kettle again?

Tyson – Ha ha ha ha, I think so…

Tyson Summers

Kettle – Do you have any other shows coming up where one could see your work? 

Tyson – I’m doing a collaboration with Diablo Texas and some solo custom toys for the Vinyl Thoughts Through The Looking Glass show. www.vinylthoughtsartshow.com Thursday, Sept 15th 7-11pm ONE NIGHT ONLY!

Kettle – What is in the future for you and your art? Do you see yourself or your art developing in any particular way in the near future?

Tyson – It’s unknown to me and a surprise to everyone else. I’m working with Vic to start making T-shirts. Loud cool simple designs for the neighborhood. 

“New Blood. Old Money.” is still up & we still aren’t sure when it’s coming down. It will be up at least another weekend or so, so get down to Deep Ellum and see it while you still can.

Round Two for Labor Day!

Here for your reading/viewing pleasure is an interview with “New Blood. Old Money.” artist, Cheryl Baker.

Enjoy …

Cheryl Baker

Cheryl Baker

www.gr8karma.com

Kettle – Tell us a bit about yourself (give a brief bio).

Cheryl – I’ve been drawing and painting since I was a kid. I’m curious about different techniques and materials so my work varies. I fall in love with each piece I do. Usually I start with an idea that I want to express but sometimes I get an image in my head that begs to be shared. I work toward being true to the idea or the image.

Cheryl Baker - Blue Chair

Blue Chair

Kettle – The name of this show is titled, “New Blood, Old Money”. Which are you, “New Blood” or “Old Money”?

Cheryl – “Old Money”

Kettle - So, how long have you been associated with Kettle Art? What past shows have you shown your work? Which one was the most memorable so far? What intrigues you about this particular show?

Cheryl – I’ve been enjoying shows at Kettle, as an art appreciator, for three or four years but it’s been over two since I first started taking part in group shows there. I loved the “Birds vs Skulls” show in 2009. The variety of work on the walls was impressive – I still remember some of those pieces. “Love of Kettle” shows (annually, in February) are always great. Nowhere else have I seen so many great works for so little money. The proceeds go toward gallery operations, so it’s a win for everybody. In June, I curated “Forces of Nature” which was a great experience for me. The artists and the gallery were a pleasure to work with!

“New Blood, Old Money” has brought my attention to artists whose work I haven’t seen before and reaffirmed my love for work by artists I’m already familiar with. Kettle sets a great example for the Dallas art scene in being open to new work.

Cheryl Baker - Almost You

Almost You

Kettle – How many pieces do you have on exhibit for “New Blood. Old Money.”? Can you tell us a little about each one?

Cheryl – I have four small pieces in this show. For “Blue Chair”, I experimented with painting onto acetate. The main image, inspired by an Elvis Costello song, is drawn in pencil and the background is painted in acrylic. “Almost You”, another Elvis inspired song, is about lost love, or really, love that failed it’s potential. “The Monk” is an image emerging from the darkness, something coming to light. The heavy cowl represents a need for protection against vulnerability. “1-15-91″ was done in remembrance of my nephew’s Gulf War experience.

Cheryl Baker - The Monk

The Monk

Kettle – What is in the future for you and your art? Do you see yourself or your art developing in any particular way in the near future?

Cheryl – I have a few ideas for some work involving the conscious/subconscious. More mixed media work.

Cheryl Baker - "1-15-91"

"1-15-91"

Kettle – Where else can one find your work? (online or otherwise)

Cheryl – Some of my work can be viewed at gr8karma.com

“New Blood. Old Money.” is still up & we still aren’t sure when it’s coming down. It will be up at least another weekend or so, so get down to Deep Ellum and see it while you still can.

It’s Labor Day! As an added bonus to your holiday,  Kettle Art will be releasing several more interviews featuring the artists currently showing in “New Blood. Old Money.”

The first artist of the day is Ashley Jones.

Enjoy …

Ashley Jones

Ashley Jones

www.facebook.com/CrashAlter.com

Kettle – Tell us a bit about yourself (give a brief bio).

Ashley – For as long as I can remember, I have had a profound love for creating art.  I never follow traditional rules or styles of art. I merely listen to my heart and where ever it leads me I go.   As the different stages of my life are revealed, my heart leads me in different directions.  This makes for an incessant change of styles and mediums.  When lead down each new path, one can see an overlapping and continuity in my art form from one progression to the next.  I rarely begin a piece with an intentional outcome in mind; otherwise, it becomes exceedingly mundane to complete.  I am currently experimenting and meandering between a few different styles and mediums; mixed media composition pieces, painting and regenerate assemblage pieces, each of which marks a noticeable and challenging transformation within my life, all of which are an attempt to unearth the means to become a full time artist.  

My method is quite simple; I am a collector of the sort of objects others would call useless; however, in my mind these objects, each and every one, have purpose.  For that reason, I merely rummage through my collection of found objects and materials and oddly enough, it is as if they pick me.  I continue adding color, texture or objects to my piece until I reach a certain unexplainable feeling of calmness, yet an uncontrollable feeling of exhilaration and accomplishment that resonates deep within my soul. It is not until then that I know my work is done.
           I love to explore and examine the world while forming my own livable chaos.  Consequently, when the urge to create arises, I have tendency to integrate these habits into my creative process. My motive to create is merely to remain grounded as well as at peace in the crazy world I subsist. I use art as a means, not only to convey the overwhelming feelings and emotions I experience daily, but moreover, as a therapeutic means to liberate myself from them.  Furthermore, I make use of my art as a device to facilitate the network of connections with those I may not have otherwise had, therefore, naturally forcing the development, evolvement and progress of my work.

Ashley Jones - Trapped

Trapped

 

Kettle – The name of this show is titled, “New Blood, Old Money”. Which are you, “New Blood” or “Old Money”?  

Ashley – “New Blood”

Kettle – So, what intrigues or excites you about exhibiting at Kettle Art?

Ashley – Kettle Art is a respected local gallery known for representing and supporting local arts. I have been following them for some time and have recognized the fact that the “Old Money” artists have been very supportive of the “New Blood” artists. As a team they are continually creating innovative ways to showcase each other’s works, and I’d like to be a part of that team.

Kettle – How many pieces do you have on exhibit for “New Blood. Old Money.”? Can you tell us a little about each one?

Ashley - I have three pieces on exhibit .

Title: “Exposed” – Size: 16”x20” –Medium: mixed media composition piece,  made from recycled paper, finished with a clear acrylic sealer.

Title: “Horse Play” – Size: 7” x 15” x 19” – Medium: Regenerate assemblage sculpture created in a wooden box with electronic parts, toys and acrylic spray paint.

Title: “Trapped” – Size: 8“x11”x16” – Medium: Regenerate assemblage sculpture put together in a wooden box with electronic parts, found objects, toys and acrylic spray paint. 

Ashley Jones - Exposed

Exposed

Kettle – Where did you find the inspiration for these pieces?

Ashley – These pieces are an amalgamate use of brilliant colors and unusual textures, which, by mixing reclaimed paper, regenerate objects and paint concentrated in various layers, blatantly express a self-liberation from years of repressed feelings and emotions.

Kettle – Were you able to attend opening night for “New Blood. Old Money.”? What was your favorite part of the night? What pieces really stood out to you?

Ashley – was able to attend opening night. I had a fabulous time. My favorite part of the night was the opportunity to meet and mingle w/ the “Old Blood” as well as the “New Money”, while enjoying the separation and parallels amongst each of our works.  

Kettle – Will you be showing with Kettle again?

Ashley – I would be honored to show at Kettle again.

Ashley Jones - Horse Play

Horse Play

Kettle – Do you have any other shows coming up where one could see your work?

Ashley – October 1st , 2011 – 6pm-10pm – “Spectrum – Explorations in Color” –  B-Side Gallery (3600 Commerce Street, Dallas TX)

October 15th, 2011 – 7:00pm – 10:00pm – “16th annual Artist’s Against AIDS” art auction, benefiting Tarrant County AIDS Outreach Center – Fort Worth Community Arts Center (100 Gendy Street, Fort Worth, TX)

February 4th, 2012 – “Incrementum II” Art Auction benefiting Ally’s house – Rising Gallery (800 Jackson Street, Dallas, TX)

I am also open and willing to participate anything else Kettle has planned for the year.

Kettle – What is in the future for you and your art? Do you see yourself or your art developing in any particular way in the near future?

Ashley – I have only recently started creating and evolving into fine art. I continually network within the local art scene in order to stay in the loop so that I may participate and become ever more involved in art exhibition opportunities where I can showcase my evolution.  I have passed beyond the stage of creating art for fun, and through local networking with local art enthusiasts I am now ready to start creating art for a purpose. Naturally, I’m a giver, supporter, and philanthropist. As an artist, in the future, I’d like my art to benefit my communities, as well as, the earth as whole.

Kettle – Where else can one find your work? (online or otherwise)

Ashley – You can see my work at: http://www.facebook.com/CrashAlter.com

I also have a large paper mosaic composition portrait , “Hailey, Alive!”, hanging at Buzzbrews on Commerce Street in Deep Ellum.  

“New Blood. Old Money.” is still up & we still aren’t sure when it’s coming down. It will be up at least another weekend or so, so get down to Deep Ellum and see it while you still can.

We’ve got a lot of artists to interview for “New Blood. Old Money.” before we put together a closing reception and decide it is time to put this show to bed. That is why over the next few days you will see interviews posted in rapid-fire succession.

So, without further delay, Kettle Art brings you another virtual sit-down with “New Blood. Old Money.” artist Arthur (“Artman”) James.

Enjoy …

Arthur ("Artman") James

 Arthur (“Artman”) James

Kettle –  Tell us a bit about yourself (give a brief bio).

 Artman – Born/raised in Dallas – which makes me a bit odd.  Went to University of North Texas for Design Communication Degree.  Professional commercial artist for the last 15 years in the advertising biz. I was obsessed with comic books as a kid – I read them, made them.  It makes since that I do this for a living.  

Kettle –  The name of this show is titled, “New Blood, Old Money”. Which are you, “New Blood” or “Old Money”? 

Artman – Im old broke-ass money;), but “New Blood” to showing at Kettle.

Kettle - What intrigues or excites you about exhibiting at Kettle Art?

Artman – Kettle is the scene. Who wouldn’t want to show there?

Arthur ("Artman") James

 

Kettle – how long have you been associated with Kettle Art? What past shows have you shown your work? Which one was the most memorable so far? What intrigues you about this particular show?

Artman – I have only participated in the “For the Love of Kettle show last year, but I’ve been associated with Frank Campangna since ’98, lived in Deep Ellum for 5 yrs.  To live in Deep Ellum was to know Frank, and to know Frank is to know Kettle.  I’m proud to have known the Kettle before the Art.  Art & Soul, Mythology of the Blues was my biggest one man, at theBoydGallery in Deep Ellum.  What intrigues me about Kettle show is the varied styles of the awesome artists.  I’d call it a “prism-show”.  All the colors of the rainbow are represented in this show.   

Kettle – How many pieces do you have on exhibit for “New Blood. Old Money.”? Can you tell us a little about each one?

Artman – I have 4 pcs. 1) “Blues Harp study IV” – ink study.  2) “Bens Chili Bowl” – mythology play on this famous chili parlor inWashingtonDC(I ate a brilliant chili dog there)and Big Foot…why not?  They’re both delicious.  3) “Attitudenial Robot”  - using robot as human metaphor.  My favorite part of this is the paper(old found newsprint sketchbook I found from my days at UNT ala ’93, AND the red nose.  My thought is how stupid we American humans can behave – all attitude and a pea for a brain. 4)  “Buzz Lounge”  this is an old portfolio box that I used to ship my artwork to advertising agencies.  The irony here, is that I made this cover as “non-commercial” as possible:)  

Arthur ("Artman") James

 

Kettle - Where did you find the inspiration for these pieces? 

Artman - Inspiration is a mysterious creature.  Specific to the pieces in this show:  An old memory, a terrific chili dog, watching the evening news, and thumbing a buzz saw at the advertising industry –  which I strangely love and do well at, and in turn is the bane of my existence.

Kettle – Were you able to attend opening night for “New Blood. Old MOney.”? What was your favorite part of the night? What pieces really stood out to you? 

Artman – Yes I attended along with my wife and rep Holly.  Meeting Tony Reans and looking at his amazing Flash Gordon pieces, were a highlight, Clint’s work is astounding and really dug Kelsey’s stuff. Everybody’s work is killer.  Also, seeing a collegue Ray-Mel Corneilious – a brilliant artist, old friend, and a salt of the earth soul. 

Arthur ("Artman") James

 

Kettle - Will you be showing with Kettle again?   

Artman –  I would love too.  In another group show or one-man, if they’d have me.

Kettle – Do you have any other shows coming up where one could see your work? 

Artman – In development, nothing nailed due to a long term project I currently working on.  I’m showing at the Meridian Room currently, and I have a bunch of my work on Facebook (Arthur James aka ARTMAN. I have this Idea (dream really), of doing a show out of an old Airstream trailer.  Kind of like a “food truck” but with Art.  I’d drive the SHOW around for a month.   

Arthur ("Artman") James

 

Kettle – What is in the future for you and your art? Do you see yourself or your art developing in any particular way in the near future? 

Artman – Mobile Art Truck.  Ive always wanted to do an art-car, sculpture show. 

Kettle – Where else can one find your work? (online or otherwise)

Artman – My Ninja rep Holly Oney’s website www.KingeswifeProductions.com, www.Foundfolios.com, Flickr, www.Workbook.com, Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Arthur-James-aka-Artman/139395560368) and in my mind yet to be discovered and uncovered.

“New Blood. Old Money.” is still up & we still aren’t sure when it’s coming down. It will be up at least another weekend or so, so get down to Deep Ellum and see it while you still can. 
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