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The Sour Grapes Crew

 

For immediate release:

Kettle Art presents “Sour Grapes”, an exhibit featuring internationally acclaimed Oak Cliff artists Arturo Donjuan, Carlos Donjuan, and Miguel Donjuan.

Please join us for the opening reception on Thursday, September 11, 7-10pm at Kettle Art Gallery, 2650-B Main St., Dallas 75226. The exhibit runs through Saturday, September 27, during regular gallery hours and by appointment.

For video of the creation of the large mural on view during this exhibit, visit http://vimeo.com/100362241

For more information, please contact kettleartgallery@gmail.com, or visit the facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1501563446756331/?ref=ts&fref=ts

About Sour Grapes

- Established in 2000 in Oak Cliff, Texas, the Sour Grapes Art Collective transitioned from graffiti artists to painters, sculptors, and photographers exhibiting in galleries across the US and Europe.

- Commissioned by the City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs to create the Jefferson Viaduct mural, Spring 2014.

- Presentations by UTA Adjunct Professor Carlos Donjuan include various lecture series hosted by the Dallas Contemporary and the Dallas Museum of Art.

- Works included in the Cheech Marin Collection, of “Cheech and Chong”, comprising the largest private collection of Chicano art in the world.

- Recent collaborations include Red Bull, Nike, Cinelli, Alife, and Fiat.

- National and regional publication mentions include: Juxtapoz, New American Paintings, The Dallas Observer, Dallas News, and D Magazine.

Press:

2014 Sour Grapes: From Street to Studio, University of Texas at San Antonio exhibit: http://utsa.edu/today/2014/06/sourgrapes.html

2014 Jefferson Viaduct mural: http://yourbestsouthwest.dallasnews.com/tag/sour-grapes/

http://blogs.dallasobserver.com/mixmaster/2013/07/the_busiest_graffiti_crew_in_a.php

2014 Everyone’s Time Is Their Own, San Francisco exhibit: http://www.juxtapoz.com/current/everyones-time-is-their-own-curated-by-gabe-scott-alter-space-sf

2013 Juxtapoz Magazine: http://www.juxtapoz.com/current/issue-preview-april-2013-w-ralph-steadman-erik-parker-parra-and-hunter-s-thompson

2013 Sour Grapes: Open Studio: http://blogs.dallasobserver.com/mixmaster/2013/03/the_sour_grapes_graffiti_crew.php

http://centraltrack.com/Culture/3746/Sour-Patch/Scenes-From-The-Sour-Grapes-Crews-Open-Studio-on-Saturday

Sour Grapes Mural

Tunnelvisions

The Deep Ellum Community Association is proud to announce the “TunnelVisions 2014″ mural unveiling, awards presentation, and live auction on May 17, 6pm – 10pm, at 2625 Main Street in Deep Ellum, TX.

Throughout the weekend of the Deep Ellum Arts Festival in April 2014, mural artists from across the city were assigned 4-hour time slots to paint 4′ x 8′ panels, to be attached to a 12′ wide, 8′ tall, 32′ deep, pop-up, walk-through TUNNEL, invoking the old Good Latimer TunnelVisions project.

See the artists in action in this video: https://www.dropbox.com/s/4lg0cq1jsbuscp1/TunnelVisions_2014.mp4

The celebration will include the fully assembled TUNNEL unveiling at 6pm, with judging from 6pm – 8pm. An awards ceremony and a live auction of all pieces will immediately follow.

50% of auction proceeds goes into future Deep Ellum murals, and 50% goes to the ARTIST!

Prizes to be awarded include: 1st place $1500; 2nd place $750; 3rd place $250; and aPeople’s Choice Award (which includes a free night at the Omni Hotel).

This exciting project also serves as the launch of the upcoming MADE (Mural Art Deep Ellum) Iinitiative sponsored the the Deep Ellum Community Association, with major announcements coming soon.

WHAT: “TUNNELVISIONS 2014″ Mural Unveiling/Awards Presentation/Live Auction

WHERE: 2625 Main Street, Deep Ellum, TX

WHEN: May 17: 6-10pm. Judging: 6-8pm. Awards Presentation and Live Auction: 8pm

PRICE: $10.00 suggested donation,
To really do this project right, we need to raise money for bigger / better murals in the future…
(All artists plus 1 guest free)

 

Tunnelvisions

In preparation for the unveiling of the massive Deep Ellum Community Association’s ‘TunnelVisions 2014′ on May 17, Kettle Art is proud to present an exhibition featuring smaller works by the artists associated with this groundbreaking project, opening on Thursday, May 15, 7-10pm.

For more details on the “TunnelVisions 2014″ mural unveiling, awards presentation, and live auction on May 17, please visit -https://www.facebook.com/TunnelVisionsDeepEllum?ref=hl

Featured artists include:

Ixchel Aguilar

Jesse Alarcon

Brad Albright

Todd Bot

Clearly

Dan Colcer

Justin Clumpner

Isaac Davies

Jashua Davies

Jerod Davies

Hatziel Flores

Sour Grapes

Nick C. Kirk

Jason MacGregor

Roxanne Mather

Cathey Miller

Mike Moffatt

Judith Lea Perkins

Alfredo Pina

David Rodriguez

Patricia Rodriguez

Richard Ross

Clint Scism

Jeff Sheely

Joe Skilz

Tony Slowmo

Jeff Thornton

Arturo Torres

Shahla Yma

As with any new venture, there are start-up costs. Kettle Art Gallery is no exception.

The new space at 2650-B Main Street is about three times bigger than the old Kettle location, but it needs a lot of work to make sure it is ready when we open to the public on September 19th.

During the next seven weeks, we will be hard at work, preparing the gallery while preserving the historic architecture and features of the building.

Line items we need to raise funds for:

  • Lumber, hardware, sheetrock, tape and bedding, texture for new art walls
  • paint for existing walls and new art walls
  • electrical wiring upgrades
  • lighting upgrades
  • audio installation
  • exterior signage

In order to meet this need, Kettle Art Gallery is asking for a little neighborly help to raise the funds necessary to make the new Kettle a beautiful place for people to see local art.

A CrowdTilt campaign has been started to help raise those funds:

https://www.crowdtilt.com/campaigns/kettle-art-gallery-relaunch/description

Please think about opening up your wallet to support “the little gallery that could”.

Thank you for your continued support! We look forward to seeing you at the opening of “Phoenix” on September 19th at the new space at 2650-B Main Street in Deep Ellum.

 

 

Back in May of this year it was announced that Kettle Art Gallery at 2714 Elm Street in Deep Ellum would be closing its doors.

Of course, ever the showman, Frank Campagna made the following statement as if he already knew the future:

“This can be seen as the end of an era but may also be viewed as a new beginning. News of our relocation will come once the dust has settled. Please rest assured this is a giant step forward. Look for our return on September 19th.”

It appears as if the “Phoenix” will rise on September 19th. A giant step forward, indeed.

Kettle Art Gallery has found it’s new home in Deep Ellum only a block over from the “Classic Kettle” location. The space, located at 2650-B Main Street, is about three times bigger than the old space. This will allow Kettle Art Gallery to use it’s space in more ways to benefit the surrounding community.

Please join us on September 19th at the new Kettle Art Gallery location to witness a Phoenix rising from the ashes.

More news related to the re-launching of Kettle Art Gallery …

Pegasus News:

http://www.pegasusnews.com/news/2013/jul/31/kettle-art-gallery-reopen-new-address-deep-ellum/

Dallas Observer:

http://blogs.dallasobserver.com/mixmaster/2013/07/kettle_art_gallery_will_stay_i.php

Here we are at the end of the road. This is, most probably, the last interview in a series of interviews featuring the artists of “New Blood. Old Money.”

Fifteen Artists were represented in the show. This is the twelfth interview.

Not all of the artists made it in on time, but as we all know, time marches on.

You see, this show closes this Saturday, September 17th. That means you literally have only three more opportunities to see this show in its entirety. We, at Kettle Art, suggest you get down to Deep Ellum pronto to check out some great art.

So, without further delay, we bring you the last virtual sit-down for “New Blood. Old Money.” where we have a quick chat with Brian A Crawford.

 Brian A Crawford

Brian A Crawford

www.crawfordartworks.com

 

Kettle – Tell us a bit about yourself (give a brief bio).

Brian – Well, I grew up in Oklahoma around the Tulsa area. I was fascinated by comic books as a kid, and always envisioned becoming a comic book artist. You could always find me drawing. My sketchpad was always nearby. As you might expect, art was my favorite subject in school & my dream was to attend Kansas City Art Institute after high school.

However, I was plagued with two nagging thoughts. How would I (really, my parents!) afford the Art Institute? How would I make a living creating art after attending college? Since I couldn’t resolve those two questions as a seventeen year-old kid, I settled on a state school & a major that would provide me with a decent living after college.

During this time I pretty much abandoned art. About the only artwork I produced was a design for a fraternity sweatshirt. The same could be said for the years following my graduation from college.

It wasn’t until after getting married in 2000, at the urging of my wife, that I started to dabble in creating art again. One class led to another until I was hooked. I even had the rare opportunity to return to school at CCCCD & UNT to work on a BFA in 2004 & 2005. Although I still find myself about 20 some-odd hours short of my degree, it was an experience that I will never forget. It was such a great time to be connected with other artists & to receive training & instruction from some great, seasoned artists. It was that re-introduction to the arts that has essentially put me where I am today.

I feel really blessed to be where I am. I currently have the best of both worlds. I have a great “day job” with a group of people with whom I really enjoy working that is a direct result of receiving my first degree outside of the art realm. It’s also that “day job” that allows me to raise a family & pursue this newfound passion for creating art. It’s my hope to continue this path indefinitely into the future as my work continues to grow & evolve.   

And These Three Remain ... Faith, Hope & Love

And These Three Remain ... Faith, Hope & Love

Kettle – The name of this show is titled, “New Blood, Old Money”. Which are you, “New Blood” or “Old Money”? 

Brian – I really struggle answering this question. You see, I totally feel like “New Blood.” Although I’ve been associated with Kettle for a while now, I still feel new to the scene. This might be because I don’t live anywhere near Deep Ellum. I’m totally out in the suburbs (McKinney). This makes it hard to stay connected with all the regular “Kettle Crew” that have been associated with the gallery for years.

I also feel like “Old Blood,” because I HAVE been associated with Kettle for a few years now. I first came in contact with Frank & the gallery in 2007 when there was a call for artists for a mural competition in Deep Ellum. I worked for a week on a study of Leadbelly to enter in the competition & ended up being selected to participate. That was such a cool experience. I had never painted a mural before & was totally intimidated by the process. Frank gave me a few pointers during the week & a lot of encouragement as I battled the heat while painting my mural. I guess it paid off because I ended up receiving third place in that competition. That mural is still up on the side of the old Elm Street Bar at Elm & Crowdus.

I returned to Deep Ellum the next year for another mural competition. This time I painted a much larger mural on the backside of the Door on Main Street. Entitled “Deep Ellum Koi,’ it depicts two koi fish encircling a yin-yang symbol with kanji-script of the word “deep” in the center. I received third place in that competition as well.

In 2009, I returned to Deep Ellum once again to participate in the Deep Ellum Mural Project where murals were painted along Good-Latimer to commemorate the opening of the Green Line Dart Rail Line. The mural I completed for this project is entitled “Gateway Koi.” It depicts two large koi leaping out of water over lily pads and flowers. It is located at Swiss & Good-Latimer. I had a blast painting that mural even though it was painted mostly in 100+ heat during the month of July. You can watch a documentary of that project here. (The documentary is courtesy of Hard Sun Productions)

It was through these early introductions to Kettle through the mural competitions that I began to display some of my work at the gallery. 

And These Three Remain ... Faith

And These Three Remain ... Faith

Kettle – So, what intrigues or excites you about exhibiting at Kettle Art?

Brian – I love the venue & I love the people. Frank really has put together a great place that allows local artists to “cut their teeth,” so to speak. It also allows artists the chance to experiment and really find the direction they want their work to go.

It has been great getting my pieces ready for this show & to be able to put them up next to other artists I respect & admire.    

And These Three Remain ... Hope

And These Three Remain ... Hope

Kettle – How long have you been associated with Kettle Art? What past shows have you shown your work? Which one was the most memorable so far?

Brian – I’ve been associated with Kettle since 2007. At first, it was mainly through the mural competitions & projects, but I have slowly begun showing other work as well. In 2009, I had paintings in three shows; “Birds Vs. Skulls,” “To Be Scene” & “The Whole Show.” In 2010, I participated in “For the Love of Kettle” & “Holiday Presence.” This year, I showed in “For the Love of Kettle” again & this show, “New Blood. Old Money.”

I would have to say that the most memorable so far would be this show, because this is the first show at Kettle where I have painted several large paintings specifically for one show. It also marks a time in my life as an artist where I have seen tremendous growth. It’s also really nice (and humbling) to have my work displayed along side some of the artists that I have admired for quite a while now.

“For the Love of Kettle” shows are also memorable because of the atmosphere. The scene of hundreds of people crowding into the gallery to snag their favorite piece art for dirt cheap is something to behold. There are always over a hundred works of art that are usually sold within the first hour or so of the doors being opened on opening night. It’s a really fun time. 

And These Three Remain ... Love

And These Three Remain ... Love

Kettle – How many pieces do you have on exhibit for “New Blood. Old Money.”? Can you tell us a little about each one?

Brian – I have six pieces on display; two triptychs.

The first triptych is the one I referred to earlier. Its a large piece consisting of three 18″ x 36″ x 2″ paintings that depict koi fish swimming over a large area of geometric patterns that exhibit signs of wear and a distinct patina in areas. It is entitled, “And These Three Remain … Faith, Hope & Love.” The title is taken from the references to scripture from 1 Corinthians 13 that are included within the painting, as well as, references to the words faith, hope & love depicted within the painting using kanji-script.

The second triptych is much smaller. It consists of three 9″ x 9″ x 2″ paintings that depict koi fish leaping out of water over the words faith, hope & love written either in English or kanji-script.

Faith, Hope, Love (FHL Triptych)

Faith, Hope, Love (FHL Triptych)

Kettle – Where did you find the inspiration for these pieces?

Brian – As you might infer from the previous question, a lot of my work draws inspiration from scripture. I find words to be extremely powerful. They can build up or tear down. They leave permanent marks once they leave the mouth or are typed on the keyboard; either for good or bad. Words have consequences. When it comes to words, scripture is foundational.

I have always been drawn to the use of words within art. Jenny Holzer’s work always comes to mind & it has definitely influenced me. I also like Sergio Garcia’s recent works where he employs the use of words that create phrases that are just a bit off. Good stuff, indeed.

I also have found inspiration from Asian culture. I started painting koi fish back in 2007 when a good friend asked me to create three paintings for a restaurant he was opening up in Seattle. After that experience, I became intrigued with the use of kanji script & with koi fish in general. I have continued painting koi fish because of their beautiful form, and because of the symbolism that can be associated with them. Because koi fish symbolize good fortune, love, courage, and are also associated with perseverance in adversity and strength of purpose, I continue to paint them while working relevant scripture into each painting.

I also find inspiration in aged things; The patina found on aged metal & the multiple layers of paint you might find peeling off of an old door. 

Faith (FHL Triptych)

Faith (FHL Triptych)

Kettle – Were you able to attend opening night for “New Blood. Old Money.”? What was your favorite part of the night? What pieces really stood out to you?

Brian – Yes, I was. My favorite part of the night was just being able to hang out with so many people & get to talk about art. I really enjoyed talking with the other artists in the show & having the opportunity to talk with one of my old instructors, Merry Fuhrer, who continues to offer guidance & encouragement to me.

All the pieces in the show were outstanding in their own right, but I did gravitate to a few choice works throughout the night.

I found the work of Kettle newcomer, Tony Reans, to be outstanding. His “Flash Gordon” pop art pieces that incorporated old Flash Gordon comic strips were so very well done.

I also enjoyed the work of curator, Clint Scism. I am totally amazed at his ability to suspend his graphic illustrations between layers of glass to produce such beautiful works.

Of course, I should also mention the work of Richard Ross. His work seems so simplistic, but I could never produce anything like it. He makes it look like the neighbor kid could have done it, but upon closer inspection you see many layers of color & a complexity all of it’s own.

Kelsey Kincannon’s work was also a highlight for me. There is just something about animals wearing suits that makes for good art! (seriously, they are wicked good) 

Love (FHL Triptych)

Love (FHL Triptych)

Kettle – Will you be showing with Kettle again?

Brian – Most definitely!

Kettle – Do you have any other shows coming up where one could see your work?

Brian – I don’t have any shows planned as of yet, but I do expect that I will have a couple pieces at “Holiday Presence” again this year.

I also have a couple other projects in the works. These projects will be a bit of a departure from the koi pieces I have been doing for the last couple of years, but the will still incorporate bold earthy colors, geometric shapes & scripture. You will just have to wait until the projects are underway to see how they unfold. :-)

Hopefully, you can watch these projects unfold on my blog.

Hope (FHL Triptych)

Hope (FHL Triptych)

Kettle – What is in the future for you and your art? Do you see yourself or your art developing in any particular way in the near future?

Brian – I hope over the next year to start working in a much larger format. I want to really loosen up my paintings, add texture, and move more toward abstraction. I’m not exactly sure how that is going to unfold, but I do have a few things planned out in my mind already.

Kettle – Where else can one find your work? (online or otherwise)

Brian – you can find me & my work online at the following places:

Website: http://www.crawfordartworks.com

Blog: http://www.crawfordartworks.com/blog/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/#!/brian.a.crawford

Facebook Fan Page: https://www.facebook.com/#!/CrawfordArtworks

Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/bacrawford

“New Blood. Old Money.” is still up, but the show closes this Saturday, September 17th. So, get down to Deep Ellum and see it while you still can. 
 
Next up at Kettle is a show that has everyone buzzing. Campagna 2 opens September 22nd featuring the art of father-daughter duo, Frank & Amber Campagna. It is most definitely a show that should not be missed!

Our third Labor Day installment brings us an interview with some definite “Old Blood.”

Tyson Summers has been associated with Kettle Art for many years now & he has most definitely made his mark on Deep Ellum.

His paintings are bold, colorful & fun. They are also all over Deep Ellum in the form of murals that he has been painting since 2007.

Enjoy this brief virtual sit-down …

Tyson Summers

Tyson Summers

www.tysonsummers.com

Kettle – Tell us a bit about yourself (give a brief bio).

Tyson – I call myself a maker of things. I like to create and have been doing so since childhood. I was born into making things with my Dad and Grandfather. Both big inspirations and both extremely talented artists and craftsmen. I knew what I wanted to do early on. My style was born out of a dissatisfaction in my graphic design day jobs. Turning doodles into sellable art, toys and murals is what I like doing.

Tyson Summers

Kettle – The name of this show is titled, “New Blood, Old Money”. Which are you, “New Blood” or “Old Money”? 

Tyson – Old in terms of the show.

Kettle – So, how long have you been associated with Kettle Art? What past shows have you shown your work? Which one was the most memorable so far? What intrigues you about this particular show?

Tyson – My first show was in July 2007 called Cartoon Art Exhibition later to turn into Cartoon Apocalypse in 2008. I’ve been a part of every group show, fundraiser, mural project since 07. Impermanence was a great show. Misha Flores, Larry Carey and myself did Mandalas in honor of the Tibetan Art and the simple fact that nothing is forever. October is my month to reboot and that what I did working on the pieces for Impermanence. 

Tyson Summers

Kettle – How many pieces do you have on exhibit for “New Blood. Old Money.”? Can you tell us a little about each one?

Tyson – Four pieces based on things that have touched my life and made me want to make things. From the little guys outside making a living to punk rock icons. It’s what makes me tick.

Kettle – Where did you find the inspiration for these pieces? 

Tyson – Pressure

Tyson Summers

Kettle – Were you able to attend opening night for “New Blood. Old Money.”? What was your favorite part of the night? What pieces really stood out to you?

Tyson – I was there, Hanging with Frank and taking the night in is always my favorite part. Where there other pieces in the show? kidding I dig checking out the stuff from the new faces.

Kettle – Will you be showing with Kettle again?

Tyson – Ha ha ha ha, I think so…

Tyson Summers

Kettle – Do you have any other shows coming up where one could see your work? 

Tyson – I’m doing a collaboration with Diablo Texas and some solo custom toys for the Vinyl Thoughts Through The Looking Glass show. www.vinylthoughtsartshow.com Thursday, Sept 15th 7-11pm ONE NIGHT ONLY!

Kettle – What is in the future for you and your art? Do you see yourself or your art developing in any particular way in the near future?

Tyson – It’s unknown to me and a surprise to everyone else. I’m working with Vic to start making T-shirts. Loud cool simple designs for the neighborhood. 

“New Blood. Old Money.” is still up & we still aren’t sure when it’s coming down. It will be up at least another weekend or so, so get down to Deep Ellum and see it while you still can.

A couple of days ago, we brought you an artist spotlight on Richard Ross. Richard is simply, a Kettle icon. His work is well known throughout Deep Ellum & the greater Dallas community.

Today we travel to the other end of the spectrum and bring you a Kettle newcomer, Aralyn McGregor.

She may be a newcomer to Kettle, but make no mistake; her work is first class. It is refined. It is layered. It is beautiful.

Doubt us? Visit her website (www.aralynmcgregor.com) to see each panel of her mural up-close & personal! Each panel is gorgeous. Period.

George Fowler should be high-fived many times over for introducing us to her wonderful paintings. (Seriously, he did a great job curating this exhibit!)

So without further delay, Kettle is proud to bring you this virtual sit down with Aralyn McGregor.

Enjoy …

 

Aralyn McGregor

Kettle – Please tell us a little about yourself (give a brief bio).
 
Aralyn – The arts are a central binding thread in my family; they inspired the growth of my passion, career, and pursuit of art. I studied at the University of North Texas, and during my senior year interned with the Cedars Art Gallery. I have shown my work in three collaborative exhibitions at the Cedars, and also exhibited my first solo show there in 2009. Upon completion of my BFA in Studio Art in 2009, I immediately began teaching art at Williams Preparatory. Teaching at both the middle school and high school level, I had the honor in establishing the first AP Studio Art program for the Dallas charter school. Teaching and bonding with the students was truly an unforgettable experience. However, the limited hours of focusing on my own pursuit of painting posed an incessant internal conflict, and I have since left teaching in order to focus on my love affair with painting and the creation of art. I am thrilled to be participating in Fractal Logic; my first professional show since I began teaching, and I look forward to delving back into the Dallas art community as a full-time artist.
 
 Kettle – When did you first discover your creative side & how long have you been pursuing the creative life?
 
Aralyn - As I mentioned, my family is founded upon creativity. My brother, dad and I recorded music together, my sister and I share photography, my mother and I both sing and create art. My extended family puts on elaborate themed parties with planning and production starting sometimes a year in advance, which remains a fantastic support for inspiration. Creativity in action was a core element in my upbringing, and continues to be a central force in the structuring of my own journey.  
 
Kettle – Do you have formal training, or are you self taught?
 
Aralyn - While at UNT, I modeled for figure drawing classes throughout Dallas. It was a wonderful invitation into artists’ studios to watch them work. I’ve learned much from working at figure painting workshops as well as with individual artists. I’ve always been drawn towards figurative art, and having the opportunity to collaborate with such a variety of artists has certainly influenced my work. 
 
 
Kettle – Could you please describe your latest body of work?
 
Aralyn - I’m fascinated by the malleability of memory. Every time you recall a memory, you are reshaping it in light of new experiences. The most fictional memories tend to be those most often reflected upon; those memories that nourish our identity and sense of self. I wanted to create a series of works exploring this concept.  The mural is composed of representational images that have been distorted, altered, and layered, some even to the point of abstraction. Images of fields, leaves, an empty street, and a girl are repeated throughout the work, but nothing substantial or conclusive can be extracted. With the intent of the viewer returning to it again and again, I hope that some new element would be revealed, providing resolution. I wanted the viewer to feel almost uncomfortable by not fully grasping a narrative. 
 
Kettle – Why did you settle on this particular medium & style?
 
Aralyn – I love working with oil paint, as it allows me to experiment with effects, shedding new light on a traditional medium. In this series, oil allowed for the layering and distortions that represent my experience of memory. 
 
Kettle – Where did you find the inspiration for your most recent work?
 
Aralyn – I find there are certain images and symbols that repeatedly appear in my work. I can connect some of these to memories, and I am still trying to figure out the source of others. If I revisit them and recreate them in enough paintings and drawings, perhaps they’ll reveal themselves in time.

 I can’t say I sit down at the easel to build upon a mission or central idea; it’s really more of a reduction process. At this point, I’m still very interested in exploring a variety of themes and ideas, and I love working with all sorts of 2-D media. The more work I produce, the more apparent these repeated images and ideas are.

Kettle – “Fractal Logic” is a bit different than what most people experience with a traditional group show being that each piece was part of a larger whole. How did that affect the way you approached your work? Did you find it to be more challenging, or did you find that it gave you more creative license?

Aralyn - I found this format to be the perfect balance of creativity and challenge. Too many boundaries challenges creative, individual expression; but too much freedom is just as difficult. Creativity thrives when there’s a problem to solve.

Kettle – What most intrigues you about your latest show at Kettle Art? Why?

Aralyn – George did a beautiful job assembling this group of artists for the show. We all presented our own diverse solution to the mural challenge. The work was consistent in quality and I am glad to have been grouped with such great artists. 

Kettle – Have you shown at Kettle Art in the past? When? What shows?

Aralyn- This is my first show at Kettle, and hope to work with Kettle again one day.

Kettle – What do you want viewers to take away from your work at this show?

Aralyn – I welcome and encourage personal, original interpretations of my work. As I stated earlier, I’m hoping viewers will want to return to this series again and again, gaining something new with each visit.

Kettle – What’s next for you creatively? Where can one see more of your work?

Aralyn - Right now I’m working on a variety of commissions, and I’m looking forward to participating in La Reunion’s Art Chicas program in the fall. I’m teaching a watercolor course at Make and Made Studio in the Bishop Arts District as well.

“Fractal Logic” wraps up this week at Kettle Art in Deep Ellum. Get down & see it soon. 

Next up is a large group show full of new faces & quite a few you already know and love. It is to be curated by Clint Scism. Please come by and check out the opening on August 18th. As always, you won’t be disappointed. Seriously!

The Fractal Logic mural show has been up for a while now & I hope that you have been down to Kettle to see this amazing show. George Fowler did an incredible job curating. He really knocked it out of the park.

If you haven’t been down to see the show yet. You best get down there! It won’t be up much longer.

It is also fitting to have Richard Ross bless us with our first (& possibly only) artist spotlight from this show.

Enjoy …

Richard Ross

 
Kettle – Please tell us a little about yourself (give a brief bio).
 
Richard – I usually make stuff up for this kind of question, because I’m just a simple person, and the truth would be boring.
 
 
Kettle – When did you first discover your creative side & how long have you been pursuing the creative life?
 
Richard - As long as I can remember, I’ve felt the desire to create rather than destroy. This has led me down several paths in my life.
  
Kettle – Do you have formal training, or are you self taught?
 
Richard - Both.  I was never a good student when I did take classes. I nearly failed art in highschool, twice.  My last college art instructors gave me a studio to go and work in by myself. They said they couldn’t teach me anything, but it was also when I had my biggest breakthroughs. I also learn a little from everyday and everything, so I can’t say I’m my own teacher. I’m just a constant student of my own life.
 
 
Kettle – Could you please describe your latest body of work?

Richard - It’s a look at conflict and how conflict seems needed to make progressions in our humankind struggles.

Kettle – Why did you settle on this particular medium & style?

Richard – I like to keep things simple.

Kettle – Where did you find the inspiration for your most recent work?

Richard – From a quote by TE Lawrence in “Seven Pillars of Wisdom”

“All men dream: but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find it was vanity, but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act on their dream with open eyes, to make it possible”

I found the quote while researching the political scientist/philosopher Gene Sharp and his works.

Kettle – “Fractal Logic” is a bit different than what most people experience with a traditional group show being that each piece was part of a larger whole. How did that affect the way you approached your work? Did you find it to be more challenging, or did you find that it gave you more creative license?

Richard - It was easier in that it was a single concept, but more difficult in that it took over 100 pieces to convey that concept.

Kettle – What most intrigues you about your latest show at Kettle Art? Why?

Richard - I am impressed by the work of the artists in the show. I knew I was fortunate to be included in the show, and I am impressed by the commitment and work each artist brought into their pieces.

Kettle – Have you shown at Kettle Art in the past? When? What shows?

Richard – yes, and too many times to list.  Two solo shows there are some of my high lights with Kettle.

Kettle – What do you want viewers to take away from your work at this show?

Richard – I want them to take the work, so I don’t have to store it… No, actually I think I’d like people to see that there’s substance in simple things. That as primitive as my work may appear on the surface, there is deep running meanings underneath.

Kettle – What’s next for you creatively? Where can one see more of your work?

Richard - I’m still continuing my journey on the road to the store.

“Fractal Logic” wraps up this week at Kettle Art in Deep Ellum. Get down & see it soon. 

Next up is a large group show full of new faces & quite a few you already know and love. It is to be curated by Clint Scism. Please come by and check out the opening on August 18th. As always, you won’t be disappointed.

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